COVID-19

UPCOMING VACCINE CLINICS

Pfizer and Moderna vaccine available for initial series and boosters.

Clinics are located at Inter-County Nursing Service – lower level of the Pennington County Government Center, 101 Main Ave N, Thief River Falls. Pre-register using the links below. Walk-ins may be accepted during clinic hours.

Clinics for anyone 5+

Friday 1/21/22 – Moderna/Pfizer/Flu combined clinic: https://prepmod.health.state.mn.us//appointment/en/reg/5712608559

Friday 1/28/22 – Moderna/Pfizer/Flu combined clinic: https://prepmod.health.state.mn.us//appointment/en/reg/5612529078

Friday 2/4/22 – Moderna/Pfizer/Flu combined clinic: https://prepmod.health.state.mn.us//appointment/en/reg/1852953602

Wednesday 2/9/22 at Northland Community and Technical College https://prepmod.health.state.mn.us//appointment/en/reg/8269580321

Friday 2/11/22 – Moderna/Pfizer/Flu combined clinic: https://prepmod.health.state.mn.us//appointment/en/reg/0315462298

Friday 2/18/22 – Moderna/Pfizer/Flu combined clinic: https://prepmod.health.state.mn.us//appointment/en/reg/1802959601

Friday 2/25/22 – Moderna/Pfizer/Flu combined clinic: https://prepmod.health.state.mn.us//appointment/en/reg/5901680712

See below for others providing COVID-19 vaccine in our area:

  • Sanford Clinic Thief River Falls: 218-681-4747
  • Altru Clinic Thief River Falls: 218-681-7280
  • Hugo’s Pharmacy Thief River Falls: 218-681-1515

Weekly COVID-19 Case Update for Pennington & Red Lake County:

COVID-19 Update for January 15th – 21st: There has been a significant increase in COVID-19 cases over the past 2 weeks. See below for the updated case data for this week. Pennington County has 4 additional cases hospitalized, ages 40’s, 60’s, 70’s & 90’s. *Please note that this data does not reflect positive results from non-laboratory tests (example: antigen rapid home tests).

We continue to urge the community to take precautions whether you are vaccinated or not. Wear a mask in indoor public spaces, social distance, stay away from crowds, stay home if you are sick, wash your hands frequently and get vaccinated.

For Statewide COVID-19 data: ✅ MN Situation Update:https://www.health.state.mn.us/…/coronav…/situation.html ✅ MN Vaccine Breakthrough Weekly Update: https://www.health.state.mn.us/…/coronav…/stats/vbt.html ✅ COVID-19 Vaccine Data: https://mn.gov/covid19/vaccine/data/index.jsp

Testing Information

Vaccine Information

About COVID-19

  • COVID-19 is an infectious disease.
  • The disease is caused by a coronavirus not found in people before.
  • As doctors and scientists continue to gather new information, it is important to take COVID-19 seriously. We do not yet know all of the negative effects it may have.
  • It is important to keep working to slow the spread of the virus by staying home when you can, staying 6 feet away from others, wearing a mask, covering your coughs and sneezes, washing your hands often and well, and getting vaccinated.
  • For more information on symptoms, see CDC: Symptoms of Coronavirus.

Watch for Symptoms

People with COVID-19 have had a wide range of symptoms reported – ranging from mild symptoms to severe illness. Symptoms may appear 2-14 days after exposure to the virus. Anyone can have mild to severe symptoms. People with these symptoms may have COVID-19:

  • Fever or chills
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing
  • Fatigue
  • Muscle or body aches
  • Headache
  • New loss of taste or smell
  • Sore throat
  • Congestion or runny nose
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Diarrhea

This list does not include all possible symptoms. CDC will continue to update this list as we learn more about COVID-19. Older adults and people who have severe underlying medical conditions like heart or lung disease or diabetes seem to be at higher risk for developing more serious complications from COVID-19 illness.

When to Seek Emergency Medical Attention

Look for emergency warning signs* for COVID-19. If someone is showing any of these signs, seek emergency medical care immediately:

  • Trouble breathing
  • Persistent pain or pressure in the chest
  • New confusion
  • Inability to wake or stay awake
  • Pale, gray, or blue-colored skin, lips, or nail beds, depending on skin tone

*This list is not all possible symptoms. Please call your medical provider for any other symptoms that are severe or concerning to you.

Call 911 or call ahead to your local emergency facility: Notify the operator that you are seeking care for someone who has or may have COVID-19.

For current CDC isolation and quarantine guidance:

https://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2021/s1227-isolation-quarantine-guidance.html

Omicron in the United States

CDC is working with state and local public health officials to monitor the spread of Omicron. As of December 20, 2021, Omicron has been detected in most states and territories and is rapidly increasing the proportion of COVID-19 cases it is causing.Omicron Data and Potential Spread

CDC is expecting a surge of COVID-19 cases in the coming days to weeks. Learn more about Omicron variant surveillance and potential rapid spread.COVID Data TrackerOmicron Potential Spread

What We Know about Omicron

CDC has been collaborating with global public health and industry partners to learn about Omicron, as we continue to monitor its course. We don’t yet know how easily it spreads, the severity of illness it causes, or how well available vaccines and medications work against it.

Spread

The Omicron variant likely will spread more easily than the original SARS-CoV-2 virus and how easily Omicron spreads compared to Delta remains unknown. CDC expects that anyone with Omicron infection can spread the virus to others, even if they are vaccinated or don’t have symptoms.

Severe Illness

More data are needed to know if Omicron infections, and especially reinfections and breakthrough infections in people who are fully vaccinated, cause more severe illness or death than infection with other variants.

Vaccines

Current vaccines are expected to protect against severe illness, hospitalizations, and deaths due to infection with the Omicron variant. However, breakthrough infections in people who are fully vaccinated are likely to occur. With other variants, like Delta, vaccines have remained effective at preventing severe illness, hospitalizations, and death. The recent emergence of Omicron further emphasizes the importance of vaccination and boosters.

Treatments

Scientists are working to determine how well existing treatments for COVID-19 work. Based on the changed genetic make-up of Omicron, some treatments are likely to remain effective while others may be less effective.

We have the Tools to Fight Omicron

Vaccines

Vaccines remain the best public health measure to protect people from COVID-19, slow transmission, and reduce the likelihood of new variants emerging.

  • COVID-19 vaccines are highly effective at preventing severe illness, hospitalizations, and death.
  • Scientists are currently investigating Omicron, including how protected fully vaccinated people will be against infection, hospitalization, and death.
  • CDC recommends that everyone 5 years and older protect themselves from COVID-19 by getting fully vaccinated.
  • CDC recommends that everyone ages 16 years and older get a booster shot after completing their primary COVID-19 vaccination series.  You are eligible for a booster at 5 months after completing Pfizer-BioNTech primary series, 6 months after completing Moderna primary series, and 2 months after the initial J&J/Janssen vaccine. Individuals ages 16-17 are only eligible for the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine.

Masks

Masks offer protection against all variants.

  • CDC continues to recommend wearing a mask in public indoor settings in areas of substantial or high community transmission, regardless of vaccination status.
  • CDC provides advice about masks for people who want to learn more about what type of mask is right for them depending on their circumstances.

Testing

Tests can tell you if you are currently infected with COVID-19.

  • Two types of tests are used to test for current infection: nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs) and antigen tests. NAAT and antigen tests can only tell you if you have a current infection.
  • Individuals can use the COVID-19 Viral Testing Tool to help determine what kind of test to seek.
    • Additional tests would be needed to determine if your infection was caused by Omicron.
    • Visit your statetribal, local, or territorial health department’s website to look for the latest local information on testing.
  • Self-tests can be used at home or anywhere, are easy to use, and produce rapid results.
    • If your self-test has a positive result, stay home or isolate for 10 days, wear a mask if you have contact with others, and call your healthcare provider.
    • If you have any questions about your self-test result, call your healthcare provider or public health department.

Until we know more about the risk of Omicron, it is important to use all tools available to protect yourself and others.

What CDC is Doing to Learn about Omicron

Virus Characteristics

CDC scientists are working with partners to gather data and virus samples that can be studied to answer important questions about the Omicron variant. Scientific experiments have already started. CDC will provide updates as soon as possible.

Variant Surveillance

In the United States, CDC uses genomic surveillance to track variants of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19 to more quickly identify and act upon these findings to best protect the public’s health. CDC established multiple ways to connect and share genomic sequence data being produced by CDC, public health laboratories, and commercial diagnostic laboratories within publicly accessible databases maintained by the National Center for Biotechnology Informationexternal icon (NCBI) and the Global Initiative on Sharing Avian Influenza Dataexternal icon (GISAID). If a variant is circulating at 0.1% frequency, there is a >99% chance that it will be detected in CDC’s national genomic surveillance.

Mental Health & COVID-19

For more details on the vaccine click on the links below:

Links

References